The Tale of Genji

The Tale of Genji

Book - 1992
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In the early eleventh century Murasaki Shikibu, a lady in the Heian court of Japan, wrote what many consider to be the world's first novel, more than three centuries before Chaucer. The Heian era (794--1185) is recognized as one of the very greatest periods in Japanese literature, and The Tale of Genji is not only the unquestioned prose masterpiece of that period but also the most lively and absorbing account we have of the intricate, exquisite, highly ordered court culture that made such a masterpiece possible.

Genji is the favorite son of the emperor but also a man of dangerously passionate impulses. In his highly refined world, where every dalliance is an act of political consequence, his shifting alliances and secret love affairs create great turmoil and very nearly destroy him.

Edward Seidensticker's translation of Lady Murasaki's splendid romance has been honored throughout the English-speaking world for its fluency, scholarly depth, and deep literary tact and sensitivity.

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Knopf, 1992
ISBN: 9780679417385
0679417389
Branch Call Number: MURASAKI S
PL788.4.G4 E5 1992
Characteristics: xxv, 1,184 p. ; 21 cm
Additional Contributors: Seidensticker, Edward 1921-2007

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buzzed
Mar 15, 2010

This 1100+-page novel about Royal Japanese life, 1000+ years ago, was a fascinating read. Chronological, characters and translation of Japanese terms as well as diagrams helped. As the novel is based upon Lady Murasaki life, I first read and recommend: "Diary of Lady Murasaki". Enjoy!

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